Thursday, September 20, 2007

Finding Places To Stay When Visiting Hong Kong

Finding Places To Stay When Visiting Hong Kong

By Nomadrick Chapo

Hong Kong is an eclectic mix of Chinese and British influences mixed with a massive amount of adrenaline. Fortunately, you can find places to stay when visiting Hong Kong without much problem.

Finding Places to Stay When Visiting Hong Kong

Hong Kong is both a modern and ancient city. First appearances reveal a modern metropolis teaming with commerce, crowds and traffic you would expect to find in any major city in the world. Walk down an alley, however, and you will find all kinds of oddities and a feel for the underlying currents of the city. Big business is done in Hong Kong, but so is a unique way of life. Whichever you pursue, you will need a good base to survive this hectic city.

Place to stay in Hong Kong come in all types of quality, shapes and prices. There are really cheap youth hostels with lots of “character” and five star luxury hotels that would make an emperor blush. Universally, the accommodations are smaller than you would expect in other parts of the world. You can expect rooms to be smaller than Thailand, but a bit bigger than what you find in Japan for corresponding prices.

Luxury lodgings are primarily located on Hong Kong Island. Hong Kong Island is the central area of Hong Kong, the location you see in pictures of the massive skyline. It is situated on an amazingly thin strip of land between the ocean and mountains. If you are doing business in Hong Kong, this is where you want to stay as most of the major commerce centers are on the island. There are a bevy of five star places offering accommodations. In truth, your choice is limited only by your budget.

If you are looking for cheaper accommodations in Hong Kong, Kowloon and the New territories offer a variety of sources. You can even find hostels on Hong Kong Island. Put another way, accommodations are plentiful regardless of where you are. Hong Kong is a major transportation hub for Asia, so it caters to all budgets.

Finding a place to stay in Hong Kong is a piece of cake. Figure out where you want to stay and then shop around to find the best prices.

About the Author: Rick Chapo is with http://www.nomadjournals.com - makers of writing journals. Visit http://www.nomadjournaltrips.com/internet_travel_articles to read more internet travel articles.

Source: www.isnare.com

Wednesday, September 12, 2007

Tips For Travelers Who Are Going To Hong Kong

Tips For Travelers Who Are Going To Hong Kong

By John Edwards

Hong Kong is a key destination for many travelers. It has a population of more than seven million, scattered all throughout its more than 200 islands.

It is located in Eastern Asia, near China and the South China Sea. Formerly, leased to Great Britain, Hong Kong was officially returned to China in 1997. Hong Kong offers diversity in: culture, religion, and lifestyles.

Chinese, (Cantonese) and English are both the official language here. So foreigners, who are planning to visit, should not have any problems exploring, and experiencing the culture of this vibrant place; since English is widely spoken here.

Hong Kong dollar is the currency in use here. One American dollar roughly equals around 7 Hong Kong dollars.

Hong Kong is known for: its unique energetic vibe, its wonderful food, and beautiful skylines. It's best to always bring a camera when roaming around in the city, so travelers can capture the essence of this place, and will always have a memento of their visit.

Hong Kong offers many great upscale shopping districts that rival the high end streets of: Shanghai, London and Paris. But the best places to shop here are the unique shops, and street markets that exhibit the charm and uniqueness of the locality.

It is wise to look around at the various stores to compare prices before buying anything. The best part of all is that sales tax is exempted on everything in Hong Kong.

The best way to get around Hong Kong is to purchase an Octopus payment card. This card takes you everywhere. It can also be used on any public transportation system, except taxis. It can even be used in vending machines, restaurants, and convenient stores, fast food places, etc.

Some of the key places in Hong Kong are:

- Hong Kong Island is the most urbanized district. It's the heart and soul of the city.

- Kowloon is one of, if not, the most populated cities in the world. It also offers the best view of the skyline.

- Disney Land Hong Kong which is located in Lantau Island. This is only the third International sight for a main Disney them park. It is best to make reservations ahead of time for lodging. It tends to be packed, especially during the holidays.

Hong Kong also has a great natural landscape that can be seen by riding a train that goes all the way up to the higher part of Hong Kong Island. With so many things to do and sights to be seen Hong Kong is truly a must see for any traveler.

About the Author: John Edwards. Find out how you can save money not only while travelling, but also save money and get better hotel room, newer rental car, fancier cruise. Get tips and advice for properly planning your travel to have the comfortable and enjoyable travel you ever had by clicking below:
http://www.forbesttravel.com

Source: www.isnare.com

Thursday, September 6, 2007

Tourism Highlights Of Hong Kong, The City Of Life

Tourism Highlights Of Hong Kong, The City Of Life

By Clint Leung

They call Hong Kong the ‘City of Life’ because it has always been so vibrant and full of energy. It’s a city that’s both exotic and cosmopolitan making it a perfect destination for first time travelers to Asia. Being a former British colony, there’s enough English signs and people able to speak the language there to make it a user friendly place. At the same time, it’s foreign enough that tourists will definitely feel that they are not on a typical beach vacation. Even after the U.K. gave Hong Kong back to China, this Chinese government designated ‘Special Administrative Region’ has not lost its dynamics. The communist government realizes the importance of Hong Kong as an economic giant and is so far adhering to a two system coexistence for China. ‘Hong Kong’ means ‘sweet harbor’ in the Chinese Cantonese dialect which is fitting as there’s so much in the city to stimulate all of the senses.

There are actually two main areas of Hong Kong. One being the Hong Kong island itself and the other being the Kowloon peninsula which is on the mainland across the harbor. The new international airport is yet on another island and transit to the city can be via train, bus or auto. The bridge that connects to Kowloon is the world’s longest road and rail bridge.

Once in the city, one will realize that Hong Kong is a very busy place with people everywhere. It has one of the densest populations as most of the 6.5 million inhabitants live in high-rise buildings due to the lack of land available. In fact, one reason why there seems to be people on the streets during all hours including the evenings is because people there want to take a break from their tiny apartments and get outside for some space. Hotel accommodations are in every budget range on both the Kowloon and Hong Kong island sides. Getting across the harbor is fairly easy. One can take the harbor ferry which actually has different class levels (the higher levels are slightly more expensive but the views are better). There’s also an underground tunnel that taxi cabs can take and like many other major cities around the world, Hong Kong also has an underground subway transit system. This subway also goes underground beneath the harbor connecting the island to Kowloon. There are double decker buses in Kong Kong as well as double decker rail street cars over on the island. One way to see the various commercial districts on the island is to stay on the streetcar for an entire loop which will take riders right across the downtown areas including some of the street markets.

Hong Kong is a contrast of old and new. There are old temples and monasteries scattered throughout. But there is also that gigantic modern skyline of tall skyscrapers that will make most North American cities appear small. There’s even the world’s longest outdoor escalator here. A must do in Hong Kong is to go to the top of the mountain of Victoria Peak on the island either by bus, auto or a special tram they have there to see spectacular views of the entire region. There are also tours of the boat village where a local will take tourists around the bay in one of their boats. One thing that is very interesting to see in Hong Kong is the early morning exercise sessions in some of the local parks. Every morning, there are crowds of locals, many of them seniors, who meet up at the parks to exercise and do tai chi.

With over 9,000 restaurants, dining in Hong Kong is also an exciting experience. There are all types of international cuisine but of course, the Chinese fare is what most visitors come here for. From elegant dining to busy dim sum houses to street stalls, there’s so much variety of food that it’s impossible to sample everything. There are even the large floating restaurants which serve the freshest seafood catches.

Of course, there’s the shopping experience in Hong Kong. Being a duty free port, there are many bargains in Hong Kong especially for textiles and electronics. Hong Kong is famous for its custom tailors who can make up a new suit within a day or two. As for electronics, for some reason Hong Kong always receives the latest models first even before North America does. Browsing through the many outdoor markets for souvenirs is another favorite activity. Be aware that bargaining is common in the markets so it is recommended to get an idea of typical prices from the retail stores first before going for deals at the markets. Kowloon has a few specialty markets worth visiting including the jade market, bird market and flower market. One must be extra careful at the jade market because if the prices are too good to be true, the pieces are probably not real jade. The night market which operates only during evenings is also fun where there are all sorts of merchandise available from clothing to toys to gadgets. There may also be entertainment such as Chinese opera on the streets during the night.

The Po Lin monastery on Lantau Island near the airport has the world’s largest outdoor Buddha. Visitors climb the steps up to the statue and there are some nice views of the scenery up top. Lantau Island can be reached by ferry via local tour companies who will also take tourists to local fishing villages. Hydrofoil crafts can take casino enthusiasts to Macau which has also been returned back to the Chinese government. There are also tours into the New Territories beyond Kowloon to see more secluded temples and countryside farms as well as other shopping opportunities located in nearby Chinese mainland towns.

It’s incredible how much there is to see and do in Hong Kong even within its relatively compact geographical area. There are so much more exotic sights and cuisine there that one simply cannot experience at the usual North American Chinatowns. At the same time, Hong Kong is so easy to get around with its efficient modes of transportation and wide range of services available in English. Tourists will never feel too lost even in a high activity place like Hong Kong.

About the Author: Clint Leung is owner of Free Spirit Gallery (http://www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca) , an online gallery specializing in Inuit Eskimo and Northwest Native American art including carvings, sculpture and prints. Free Spirit Gallery has numerous information resource articles with photos of authentic Inuit and Native Indian art as well as free eCards.

Source: www.isnare.com

Sunday, September 2, 2007

Travel To Macau And The Cotai Strip, China

Travel To Macau And The Cotai Strip, China

By Robert Borhi

Macau is a small peninsula region in China, southwest of Hong Kong. There are scheduled boat charters to and from Macau and Hong Kong throughout the day. It is an easy day trip from one place to the other. If you are planning a trip to Hong Kong, you should strongly consider spending a little time in Macau as well.

The total population of Macau is close to half a million people. Most of the residents are of Chinese origin from various Chinese provinces. The remaining population (approximately 5%) are of Portuguese and European ancestry. Macau used to be a colony of Portugal before it was returned to Chinese control in the late 1990’s. In case you were wondering, Macau is sometimes referred to as ‘Macao’, due to the Portuguese history of the area. The official languages are Chinese and Portuguese, with Cantonese being the most widely used. English is mainly used for tourism and business.

The many attractions in Macau make it well worth a visit. Because of the Portuguese establishment, there are old fortresses, churches, temples and gardens to tour. There are over a dozen museums to see, including the Museum of Macau, the Maritime Museum, the Wine Museum, the Grand Prix Museum, and the Handover Gifts Museum. Every year, around November, there are the Macau Grand Prix car and motorcycle races. The Macau Tower, at 338m tall, is definitely worth a visit. Throughout the year there are many other events and festivals that you may be able to take part in. Walking tours and shopping opportunities also abound. Aside from many new casinos being built, you might want to try your luck at some of the older casinos, or even at the horse racing and greyhound racing tracks.

There is much development underway in Macau, and this development will soon bring even more visitors. Many hotels, casinos, resorts and convention centers are currently being built, with the first ones scheduled to open in 2006 and 2007. Some of the development is occurring on the Cotai Strip, which is reclaimed land between two islands of Macau called Coloane and Taipa. The spelling of ‘Cotai’ comes from the names of these two islands. These developments are being planned by combinations of world class hotel chains and major Las Vegas casinos, so they are bound to be impressive. The goal of the developers is to turn Macau into an international destination for resorts and casinos, and you often hear the term ‘Asia’s Las Vegas’. Up to six billion dollars is being spent on these developments, with 10,000 hotel rooms in the initial phase, and expansion to 60,000 rooms in the third phase. Gambling in Macau will be a major attraction in the years to come.

If you spend some time travelling around Macau, you will likely travel across the bridges on the peninsula. The names of two of the bridges are Nobre de Carvalho (the Friendship Bridge) and Sai Van Bridge. The Friendship Bridge is the longest one and goes directly to the Macau International Airport. Yes, you can fly directly into Macau! The airport is situated on the Island of Taipa.

In closing, if you are interested in experiencing a blend of two cultures over a small area, with loads of unique touring opportunities and attractions, then Macau and the Cotai strip should be your next vacation!

About the Author: Robert Borhi is a freelance writer and owner of Macau.ca, a website that focuses on Macau travel and attractions. If you are planning a visit to Macau or the Cotai strip, you can learn more about this wonderful destination at his website http://www.Macau.ca




Source: www.isnare.com

Saturday, September 1, 2007

The Hong Kong Disneyland Resort

The Hong Kong Disneyland Resort

By Pete Anderson

On September 12, 2005, the newest member of the Disneyland family of theme parks and resorts opened to the public. Hong Kong Disneyland is located on the island of Lantau, positioned to look out over Penny's Bay and the Chinese Sea. Started as a joint operation between The Walt Disney Company and the Hong Kong SAR government, Hong Kong Disneyland brings the magic of Disney to a whole new environment, respecting the aspects of the culture of the country where it makes its home. The park boasts 2 glamorous hotels, the Disneyland Hotel and Disney's Hollywood Hotel.

Hong Kong Disneyland has some of the attractions that will be familiar to visitors of Disney's other parks. Main Street looks like a piece of Americana transplanted, with the Hong Kong Disneyland Railroad for a trip around the park. There's also Adventureland, with the exciting Jungle River Cruise and all of the animal sights and sounds. Tarzan has made his home in Adventureland, where guests can take a ride on a raft to cross to Tarzan Island where they can visit Tarzan's Tree House. For those who love the movie The Lion King, there is a musical performance based on the story as well – The Festival of the Lion King.

In the original Disneyland, Fantasyland is well known for the symbol that people think of when speaking of Disney - Cinderella's Castle. Hong Kong Disneyland's version is the castle of Sleeping Beauty, where children can explore the fairy tale and their own imagination. They can also visit the grotto of another Disney princess, Snow White. Cinderella is there too, represented by a beautiful carousel ride. There's everyone's favorite bear at The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh ride. More popular Disney rides include the Mad Hatter Tea Cups and Dumbo the Flying Elephant. Children and grown-ups can watch a 3-D movie with all the favorite Disney characters at Mickey's PhilharMagic or The Golden Mickeys at Disney's Storybook Theater.

The fourth area, Tommorrowland, gives visitors a Disney vision of the future. The three main attractions include 2 of the fastest most exciting rides in the park. Space Mountain is a literally rocketing rollercoaster. Orbitron lets you pilot your own jet through the sky of whirling planets. You can also play a cosmic game of Buzz Lightyear Astro Blasters with the whole family. In 2006 guests will have a new adventure to enjoy. Autopia will have visitors driving futuristic electric cars around a track meant to envision the roads of tomorrow.

Visitors can choose to stay inside the park at one of the two beautiful new hotels. The Hong Kong Disneyland Hotel is designed to take you back in time to the grandness of the Victorian era. The European influence is obvious in the 400 luxuriously appointed rooms. Guests can enjoy spa services at the hotel as well. At Disney's Hollywood Hotel, the 600 guest rooms are decorated in an art deco style, meant to bring back the allure of the golden age of Hollywood.

Although the park exposes local visitors to traditions and exhibits from the Western world, local culture is honored as well. At the opening ceremonies children sang in English, Cantonese and Putonghua. The Hong Kong Children's Choir was followed by other local traditional performances such as Chinese acrobats and dancers performing a Lion Dance. The ceremonies were attended by members of the local government as well as representatives from Disneyland theme parks in other countries. The culture of the Hong Kong region is also reflected in the cuisine served throughout the park. Yes, guests can find food that is more often served in the West, but also local dishes that they'll enjoy as well.

About the Author: For more information on Disney hotels and parks visit http://www.Disney-Hotels.org - a complete guide to accomodations, dining and recreation at Disney World and Disneyland.

Source: www.isnare.com

Sunday, August 12, 2007

Macau Casinos

Macau Casinos

By Adel Awwad

Gambling in Macau (or Macao) was legalized in 1850, under Portuguese rule, and since that time it has been known as the "Monte Carlo of the Orient." Both foreign and domestic corporations have invested heavily in Macau casinos, and tourists frequently visit them from Hong Kong and the mainland of the People's Republic of China. In fact, gambling and tourism are the chief sources of income in Macau.

There are a number of casinos in Macau, all operating under government rules and regulations, and most are open 24 hours a day. Games at Macau casinos include blackjack, roulette, boule, sic bo, Fan-Tan, keno, and the very popular game of baccarat. The largest of the Macau casinos is the Casino Lisboa, a four-story complex originally built in the early 1970's, by a Stanley Ho company. The Casino Lisboa in downtown Macau has been enlarged to a total of 927 rooms and another extension is planned to meet the competition of the adjacent Wynn Macau, owned by Steve Wynn of Las Vegas.

In comparison, the Floating Palace, located on a barge about a five-minute walk from the ferry terminal, is the smallest Macau casino. The second deck has six baccarat tables, two for blackjack, and two for dai-siu and sic bo. In addition, there is a small slot machine room and other areas that are probably used for private gambling games. For a change of pace in a quieter atmosphere, the Floating Palace has low table limits and is a good option to consider.

The Pharoah's Casino, within the 5-star Landmark Hotel, is in a prime city center location. The Pharaoh's, on the 3rd floor, offers a luxurious gambling experience, with 383 slots and 19 table games including baccarat, roulette, nine tables of poker, and eight of blackjack.

In addition, Macau casinos include the Fortuna in the Hotel Fortuna, conveniently located within walking distance of the shopping and business districts, and the Casino Golden Dragon. Located on the 2nd and 3rd floors of the popular Hotel Golden Dragon, it has 72,600 square feet of lively, carnival-like atmosphere. The d├ęcor of the Golden Dragon is based upon festivals from Europe, China, America, and Latin America, including a Spanish fire lighting display on the ceiling of the main gambling floor. Six of the VIP rooms feature the Trinidad carnival, the Venice mask festival, 19th century Paris, Mardi Gras, the Carnivale de Rio de Janeiro, and Chinese dragon dancing. The Casino Golden Dragon, with 85 gaming tables (15 for VIPs), 3-card poker, baccarat, sic bo, and blackjack, and 137 slots is filled with fun and excitement.

For a time, Macau casinos, for the most part, did not have the glitz and glamor of Vegas or Atlantic City, but with the influx of foreign investors that too is changing.

About the Author: This article is the property of Macau Casinos

Source: www.isnare.com

Sunday, July 22, 2007

Travel Hong Kong: 12 Must See Places

Travel Hong Kong: 12 Must See Places

By Robert Thatcher

Hong Kong features a diverse mixture of characters as a result of long British occupation and a great Chinese influence. As a state of China, Hong Kong provides a good introduction to who ever wants to know more about China without entering the mainland plus a venue for more attractions with western culture and Asian spirit.

1. Hong Kong Museum of Art

– Located at 10 Salisbury Rd Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, the Hong Kong Museum of Art is open to anyone who wants to take a glimpse of Hong Kong’s culture and history through its large collection of over 14,000 items ranging from calligraphy, paintings, Hong Kong treasure, art objects, antiques, and lithographs. The museum is open from 10:00am-6:00pm daily except Thursday (public holidays not included).

2. Hong Kong Disneyland

– The newly open and the first ever Disneyland in Asia offers total fun and excitement for the whole family. The park is divided into four major attractions: Tomorrowland, Adventureland, Fantasyland, and Main Street, USA.

3. Victoria Peak

– Soaring 1810 feet above sea level, the Victoria Peak is premier destination for tourists who want to take a birds eye view of downtown Hong Kong, Kowloon, and Victoria Harbour. Go another step higher and take a 10-minute hike to the actual Victoria Peak.

4. Lantau Island

– Travel Hong Kong and take a cruise around the waters of Lantau Island and watch pink dolphins that only live in this waters.

5. Ocean Park

– Travel Hong Kong and visit Ocean Park. This is one Hong Kong attractions where you and your kids will have a great fun. The park is one big oceanarium containing Lowlands Gardens where pandas live, goldfish pagoda and butterfly house are located, Marine Land where atoll reef and shark aquariums are found, and Headlands amusement park where you can go and take a ride with cable cars and roller coasters.

6. Water World

– Travel Hong Kong with kids would never be so much fun without taking a plunge on Water World. Enjoy wave pools, play area, and water slides.

7. Middle Kingdom

– A miniature China that houses Chinese shrines, street scenes, temples, and palaces only at Middle Kingdom.

8. The Central district

– If you travel to Hong Kong because you love to shop, you better go to the central Hong Kong district where big shopping malls and several Western designer and signature boutiques are located.

9. Lamma Island

- If you want to see a different Hong Kong, try Lamma Island. It hosts several outdoor activities such as swimming and hiking. And if you love to taste fresh Hong Kong seafood in great dining ambiance, Lamma Island is still the preferred place to go.

10. Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery (Sha Tin)

– Located at New Territories, the Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery features Buddha in different poses and colors.

11. Hong Kong Space Museum

– See what’s in store for you in the future at Hong Kong Space Museum. The complex offers hundreds of displays ranging from telecommunications, robotics, energy, computers, and physics with hands on experience that will keep you interested.

12. Wet Market

– In Hong Kong, everything is fresh. And when they say fresh, they mean it. If you happen to travel Hong Kong to visit a friend or someone you know, come along when they go to wet market where the freshest among freshest seafood are for sale.

About the Author: Robert Thatcher is a freelance publisher based in Cupertino, California. He publishes articles and reports in various ezines and provides hong kong travel resources on www.your-hong-kong-travel.info.

Source: www.isnare.com